Wednesday, 06 January 2021 00:00

Why Live with Pain and Numbness in Your Feet?

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Monday, 04 January 2021 00:00

Location of the Plantar Fascia

Pain and discomfort often accompanies the foot condition that is known as plantar fasciitis. It can occur as a result of an inflamed plantar fascia, which is located on the bottom of the foot. The Plantar fascia is a portion of tissue that connects the heel to the toes and is crucial in completing basic foot movements. Plantar fasciitis can develop from standing on hard surfaces for extended periods of time throughout the day, overuse, or from a sudden weight gain. Common symptoms can include heel pain after arising in the morning and difficulty walking. It is beneficial to properly stretch the feet before and after exercising, as this may be helpful in preventing plantar fasciitis. If you are afflicted with this condition, please consult with a podiatrist to learn about treatment options.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists  from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis

People with diabetes also often have poor circulation in the lower limbs as well as damaged nerve function, known as neuropathy. Neuropathy can result in pain, numbness, tingling, or a loss of sensation in the feet. The combination of a loss of sensation and poor blood flow in the feet can be particularly dangerous, as it makes the development of diabetic foot ulcers more likely. Diabetic foot ulcers are slow-healing wounds on the bottom of the feet. Left unnoticed and untreated, the wounds can grow, become infected, and lead to serious complications, such as tissue death and amputation. It is very important to inspect the feet daily to detect wounds and other potentially harmful changes early. If you have diabetes and notice any injuries, pain, or other changes in your feet, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.  

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care

A fungal infection of the skin on the feet is known as athlete's foot. It is often uncomfortable and may appear unsightly. Blisters can develop between the toes and the skin is generally red and itchy. Peeling skin may occur on the sole of the affected foot, and the toenails can become discolored. The fungus that causes this type of infection lives in warm and moist environments. These can consist of public swimming pools and shower room floors. It is beneficial to wear appropriate shoes while frequenting these areas as this may help to prevent the spreading of athlete's foot. Treatment methods can include applying topical antifungal medication, and this may help to provide mild relief. If you are afflicted with this ailment, please speak with a podiatrist who can determine what the best treatment is for you.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Athlete’s Foot
Wednesday, 16 December 2020 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Monday, 14 December 2020 00:00

What Is a Sprained Toe?

A sprained toe is a very common foot injury that can affect anyone at any time. The more frequent causes tend to be stubbing the toe or injuring it during a sporting activity. A sprained toe means torn ligaments, and this can hinder completing daily activities, not to mention the pain and discomfort that often coincides. Sprained toes are classified into three categories and the healing time is governed by which area they fall into. A mild sprain takes the least amount of time to heal, and the patient may be fully recovered within two weeks. The ligaments may be partially torn in a moderate sprain, and the toe may be unstable. The healing time with this type of sprain can extend to up to five weeks. The full healing time with a severe sprain can take six weeks or longer, and can require the most amount of care. If you have a sprained toe it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose the severity of your injury and guide you toward proper treatment techniques.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Monday, 07 December 2020 00:00

Risk Factors for Developing Neuropathy

Neuropathy occurs when nerves that are in the feet or hands become damaged. Common symptoms of neuropathy include a sense of numbness or tingling, burning or stabbing pain, a loss of balance, and muscle weakness in the feet. Those who are older, have a family history of neuropathy, are malnourished, or have preexisting conditions like diabetes or cancer, are at a higher risk for developing neuropathy. Treatment options for this condition may include a nutritional plan, pain medications, or physical therapy. If you believe that you are afflicted with neuropathy it is important to consult with a podiatrist for proper treatment.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Neuropathy

The Achilles tendon is located in the back of the leg, and connects the heel to the calf muscles. It plays an important role in daily life and can cause severe pain and discomfort if it becomes injured. An Achilles tendon injury can happen for a variety of reasons, including overuse, stepping off of a curb unexpectedly, and from frequently wearing high heels. Common symptoms of this type of injury can include immediate pain, swelling, and bruising. Many patients that have endured an Achilles tendon injury realize it takes several weeks for a complete recovery to occur. It is beneficial to keep the affected foot elevated as often as possible, and it can help to perform specific stretches that may aid in the healing process. If you are currently experiencing an Achilles tendon injury, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you toward a full recovery.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries
Wednesday, 25 November 2020 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Monday, 23 November 2020 00:00

How Common Are Bunions?

A bunion is a type of foot deformity in which a bony bump forms on the side of the foot near the base of the big toe. Bunions develop slowly, as pressure on the joint at the base of the toe causes the toe to move out of place. Although bunions can sometimes be embarrassing, if you have them, you aren’t alone. About a third of adults in the United States have bunions. Bunions may cause foot pain, stiffness, redness, or swelling and tend to worsen over time, potentially making wearing your regular shoes, or even walking, more difficult. Seeking treatment can help. Treatment options may include wearing orthotic insoles and wider shoes, taking oral medications to relieve pain, or wearing special braces or pads on the foot. In more severe cases, surgery may be an option. If you have bunions, consult with a podiatrist to determine which treatments are right for you. 

If you are suffering from bunions, contact one of our podiatrists of Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Page 11 of 42
Hackensack University Medical Center Logo American Podiatric Medical Association Logo American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Logo The Association of Extremity Nerve Surgeons Logo American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine Logo Atlas Foot Alignment Institute Logo