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Fair Lawn - Paramus area (201) 791-1881
 
Riverdale - Wayne area (973) 831-1774
 
Englewood - Ft Lee area (201) 569-7672

May 2020

Tuesday, 26 May 2020 00:00

How Can I Treat My Broken Toe?

Broken toes can cause pain, discomfort, and difficulty with walking. Many broken toes are not severe, and can heal properly with the correct treatment method. This ailment may occur from dropping a heavy object on the toe, or from stubbing it on a piece of furniture. The toes have small bones that are located on the outer edge of the body, which can make them vulnerable to outside forces. There are noticeable symptoms that develop with broken toes. These can include swelling, bruising, and they can look displaced if the fracture is severe. For mild cases of broken toes, an effective method known as buddy taping may be implemented. This consists of taping the affected toe to the toe next to it, which may help to keep it stable. This can generally help the toe to heal properly. If you feel you have broken your toe, please consult  with a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn and Riverdale, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 26 May 2020 00:00

How Can I Treat My Broken Toe?

Broken toes can cause pain, discomfort, and difficulty with walking. Many broken toes are not severe, and can heal properly with the correct treatment method. This ailment may occur from dropping a heavy object on the toe, or from stubbing it on a piece of furniture. The toes have small bones that are located on the outer edge of the body, which can make them vulnerable to outside forces. There are noticeable symptoms that develop with broken toes. These can include swelling, bruising, and they can look displaced if the fracture is severe. For mild cases of broken toes, an effective method known as buddy taping may be implemented. This consists of taping the affected toe to the toe next to it, which may help to keep it stable. This can generally help the toe to heal properly. If you feel you have broken your toe, please consult  with a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Published in Blog

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Published in Blog

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Published in Blog
Monday, 18 May 2020 00:00

Prompt Treatment of Diabetic Wounds

Foot wounds are serious conditions that can develop in diabetic patients. People who have diabetes may have difficulty in feeling if there are cuts on their feet, which can develop into foot ulcers. This type of wound requires prompt treatment, which includes cleaning the wound, followed by dressing it with a proper bandage. Diabetic patients may reduce their risk of getting cuts and bruises on their feet by wearing shoes that are comfortable. Additionally, it is beneficial to avoid walking barefoot, wear clean socks, and maintain control of blood glucose levels. If you have developed a wound on your foot, it is advised you confer with a podiatrist who can offer proper treatment options which may include prescribing antibiotics.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn and Riverdale, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Published in Blog
Monday, 18 May 2020 00:00

Prompt Treatment of Diabetic Wounds

Foot wounds are serious conditions that can develop in diabetic patients. People who have diabetes may have difficulty in feeling if there are cuts on their feet, which can develop into foot ulcers. This type of wound requires prompt treatment, which includes cleaning the wound, followed by dressing it with a proper bandage. Diabetic patients may reduce their risk of getting cuts and bruises on their feet by wearing shoes that are comfortable. Additionally, it is beneficial to avoid walking barefoot, wear clean socks, and maintain control of blood glucose levels. If you have developed a wound on your foot, it is advised you confer with a podiatrist who can offer proper treatment options which may include prescribing antibiotics.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Published in Blog
Monday, 11 May 2020 00:00

Stress and Poor Circulation

Poor circulation may be indicative of existing medical conditions. Common symptoms of this condition may include a tingling or numbing sensation in the feet, severely dry skin, and your feet may feel unusually tired. There may be medical conditions and lifestyle habits that may cause poor circulation. Other causes may include smoking, eating unhealthy foods, and having high blood pressure. Research has indicated high stress levels may lead to elevated blood pressure, which can cause poor circulation as well. To help alleviate some stress, it may be beneficial to practice meditation. If you have symptoms of poor circulation, it is suggested that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can offer you correct treatment techniques.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn and Riverdale, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Published in Blog
Monday, 11 May 2020 00:00

Stress and Poor Circulation

Poor circulation may be indicative of existing medical conditions. Common symptoms of this condition may include a tingling or numbing sensation in the feet, severely dry skin, and your feet may feel unusually tired. There may be medical conditions and lifestyle habits that may cause poor circulation. Other causes may include smoking, eating unhealthy foods, and having high blood pressure. Research has indicated high stress levels may lead to elevated blood pressure, which can cause poor circulation as well. To help alleviate some stress, it may be beneficial to practice meditation. If you have symptoms of poor circulation, it is suggested that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can offer you correct treatment techniques.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Published in Blog

The bones in the foot that are fractured the most are known as the metatarsal bones. They consist of five bones that run the length of the foot, and end at the bottom of the toes. A broken foot can be the result of a sudden injury that may occur in sporting activities, or it can happen from unexpectedly stepping off a curb, where it may become severely twisted. Stress injuries may also cause a broken foot, and this can gradually occur from performing repetitive running or jumping activities. Common symptoms that are associated with this condition can include severe bruising, immediate pain on or around the affected area, and it is uncomfortable to walk and put weight on the foot. If you feel you may have broken your foot, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can perform a proper diagnosis and begin the correct treatment.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn and Riverdale, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Published in Blog

The bones in the foot that are fractured the most are known as the metatarsal bones. They consist of five bones that run the length of the foot, and end at the bottom of the toes. A broken foot can be the result of a sudden injury that may occur in sporting activities, or it can happen from unexpectedly stepping off a curb, where it may become severely twisted. Stress injuries may also cause a broken foot, and this can gradually occur from performing repetitive running or jumping activities. Common symptoms that are associated with this condition can include severe bruising, immediate pain on or around the affected area, and it is uncomfortable to walk and put weight on the foot. If you feel you may have broken your foot, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can perform a proper diagnosis and begin the correct treatment.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Published in Blog

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