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December 2020

People with diabetes also often have poor circulation in the lower limbs as well as damaged nerve function, known as neuropathy. Neuropathy can result in pain, numbness, tingling, or a loss of sensation in the feet. The combination of a loss of sensation and poor blood flow in the feet can be particularly dangerous, as it makes the development of diabetic foot ulcers more likely. Diabetic foot ulcers are slow-healing wounds on the bottom of the feet. Left unnoticed and untreated, the wounds can grow, become infected, and lead to serious complications, such as tissue death and amputation. It is very important to inspect the feet daily to detect wounds and other potentially harmful changes early. If you have diabetes and notice any injuries, pain, or other changes in your feet, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.  

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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A fungal infection of the skin on the feet is known as athlete's foot. It is often uncomfortable and may appear unsightly. Blisters can develop between the toes and the skin is generally red and itchy. Peeling skin may occur on the sole of the affected foot, and the toenails can become discolored. The fungus that causes this type of infection lives in warm and moist environments. These can consist of public swimming pools and shower room floors. It is beneficial to wear appropriate shoes while frequenting these areas as this may help to prevent the spreading of athlete's foot. Treatment methods can include applying topical antifungal medication, and this may help to provide mild relief. If you are afflicted with this ailment, please speak with a podiatrist who can determine what the best treatment is for you.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Wednesday, 16 December 2020 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

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Monday, 14 December 2020 00:00

What Is a Sprained Toe?

A sprained toe is a very common foot injury that can affect anyone at any time. The more frequent causes tend to be stubbing the toe or injuring it during a sporting activity. A sprained toe means torn ligaments, and this can hinder completing daily activities, not to mention the pain and discomfort that often coincides. Sprained toes are classified into three categories and the healing time is governed by which area they fall into. A mild sprain takes the least amount of time to heal, and the patient may be fully recovered within two weeks. The ligaments may be partially torn in a moderate sprain, and the toe may be unstable. The healing time with this type of sprain can extend to up to five weeks. The full healing time with a severe sprain can take six weeks or longer, and can require the most amount of care. If you have a sprained toe it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose the severity of your injury and guide you toward proper treatment techniques.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 07 December 2020 00:00

Risk Factors for Developing Neuropathy

Neuropathy occurs when nerves that are in the feet or hands become damaged. Common symptoms of neuropathy include a sense of numbness or tingling, burning or stabbing pain, a loss of balance, and muscle weakness in the feet. Those who are older, have a family history of neuropathy, are malnourished, or have preexisting conditions like diabetes or cancer, are at a higher risk for developing neuropathy. Treatment options for this condition may include a nutritional plan, pain medications, or physical therapy. If you believe that you are afflicted with neuropathy it is important to consult with a podiatrist for proper treatment.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Active Foot and Ankle Care, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Fair Lawn, Riverdale, and Englewood, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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